5 types of cancer linked to alcohol consumption

5 types of cancer linked to alcohol consumption

Drinking alcohol has been linked to multiple types of cancer. (Photo via Getty Images)

This article is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Contact a qualified medical professional before engaging in any physical activity, or making any changes to your diet, medication or lifestyle.

Although there is no cure for cancer, researchers are working harder than ever to find a solution.

Over time, studies have concluded that the development of cancer is linked to a variety of risk factors such as genetics, diet and exercise.

Lifestyle factors also play a role in the development of certain cancers.

Specifically, drinking alcohol has been linked to multiple types of cancer including breast, colon, esophageal, liver and mouth.

How certain foods and beverages are linked to cancer

Substances known as carcinogens have been scientifically proven to cause or contribute to the development of cancer.

Carcinogens can be found in our environment, in chemicals and substances we come in contact with, and are found in the food and drinks we consume.

Certain foods like red meat and processed meats are considered carcinogenic. Additionally, sugary drinks have been indirectly linked to cancer because they contribute to weight gain, which is a risk factor for the condition.

Alcohol is considered a group one carcinogen and a significant contributor to the development of cancer.

Detail of assorted red and white wines alcohol on a table

Alcohol is considered a group 1 carcinogen and a significant contributor to the development of cancer. (Photo via Getty Images)

Canadian guidelines for drinking

Abiding by Canada’s low-risk alcohol drinking guidelines is a good way to ensure you don’t increase your risk of developing alcohol-related cancer.

The current Canadian guidelines for drinking are as follows:

  • Women should have no more than 10 drinks per week or two drinks per day most days.

  • Men should have no more than 15 drinks each week or three drinks each day most days.

  • On special occasions, women should have no more than three drinks, and men should have no more than four.

  • All individuals should avoid drinking every day.

  • Additionally, Canada’s alcohol guidelines recently suggested that people should refrain from drinking more than three alcoholic beverages per week to lower the risk of developing certain diseases including cancer.

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    Woman holding and showing a pink ribbon to the camera as a symbol of breast cancer awareness. Cancer awareness and health concept.

    Women who drink alcohol increase their risk of developing breast cancer. (Photo via Getty Images)

    Five types of cancer linked to alcohol consumption

    Below are five common cancers that have been scientifically linked to drinking alcohol.

    1. Breast cancer

    The link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer has not been unanimously defined.

    However, the leading theory is that alcohol consumption contributes to estrogen circulation in women who have not yet undergone menopause, which is necessary for breast cancer to develop.

    According to Cancer Care Ontario, females who have at least two drinks of alcohol per day increase their risk of developing breast cancer by up to 31 per cent compared to individuals who don’t drink.

    This risk is lowered to a 10 per cent increase in women who only drink one alcoholic beverage daily.

    Man suffers painful abdomen injury and holds painful area with hands, Gastritis, Stomach pain, Reflux acids.

    Alcohol contributes to the development colon cancer through the creation of polyps. (Photo via Getty Images)

    2. Colon cancer

    Alcohol contributes to the development colon cancer through the creation of polyps. This happens when your body processes alcohol, which can damage colon cell DNA.

    In 2020, a study by the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer found that alcohol consumption was linked to 20 per cent of new colon cancer cases in Canada.

    Esophageal and stomach cancer awareness month, and Gastroesophageal Acid Reflux Disease (GERD) Awareness Week with Periwinkle color ribbon on helping hand support and aged wood

    Drinking alcohol can dramatically increase your risk of developing esophageal cancer. (Photo via Getty Images)

    3. Esophageal cancer

    Drinking alcohol can dramatically increase your risk of developing esophageal cancer.

    A study from McGill University found that heavy drinkers increased their risk of esophageal cancer by seven times compared to non-drinkers.

    The risk of developing esophageal cancer increases when combined with smoking tobacco.

    Liver cancer computer illustration.

    Drinking can contribute to alcohol-induced liver cancer and disease. (Photo via Getty Images)

    4. Liver cancer

    People are encouraged to avoid alcohol for their liver health, but are often unaware that drinking can contribute to alcohol-induced liver cancer and disease.

    However, the link between alcohol and liver cancer has been defined as “probable” by the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund because liver cirrhosis typically encourages people to stop drinking.

    Woman with thyroid gland problem

    Alcohol consumption increases the risk of developing mouth and throat cancers. (Photo via Getty Images)

    5. Mouth and throat cancers

    Alcohol consumption increases the risk of developing mouth and throat cancers.

    Aside from altering your DNA and affecting your hormonal balance, alcohol can alter your cellular makeup in this area of the body.

    As a result, the cells of your mouth and throat may be more permeable to potential carcinogens.

    How to lower your risk for cancer linked to alcohol use

    While alcohol is directly linked to the development of certain cancers, it’s not a guarantee that you will develop the condition.

    However, the best way of lowering your risk of cancer linked to alcohol consumption is to abide by Canada’s low-risk alcohol drinking guidelines.

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