Emergency rooms across Ohio packed as three viruses act together in surge

Emergency rooms across Ohio packed as three viruses act together in surge

Emergency rooms across Ohio are packed, urgent cares are jammed, and three viruses causing the problems have not backed down.During the Ohio Department of Health briefing Tuesday, hospital representatives in three separate regions reported issues because of the respiratory syncytial virus, the flu and COVID-19.“We are seeing record high volumes in our emergency rooms, our urgent cares and in our hospitals in general,” said Cincinnati Children’s Hospital’s chief of staff Dr. Patty Manning.Manning said they haven’t seen the kinds of numbers they’re seeing right now.“We’ve broken our census records, I’ve lost count of the times we’ve broken them, and for us, that means we have over 600 patients in the hospital, and that’s a lot of patients,” Manning said. “Our hospitals, especially our pediatric hospitals, right now, are overwhelmed,” said University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children’s of Cleveland Dr. Claudia Hoyen.In Columbus, there are similar problems.“We are all experiencing exceptionally high volumes in our emergency departments,” said Nationwide Children’s Hospital’s Dr. Rustin Morse.Having the three viruses acting together is unusual, but so is the fact that they are hitting earlier in the year than expected.“What is really unique this year is how much earlier than usual, and the volumes are much higher than usual,” Morse said.Adding to the concerns is that it all comes as Thanksgiving gatherings are approaching.Doctors at all three hospitals and with the Ohio Department of Health agreed that getting a flu vaccine and a COVID-19 shot are the best ways to stay healthy.

Emergency rooms across Ohio are packed, urgent cares are jammed, and three viruses causing the problems have not backed down.

During the Ohio Department of Health briefing Tuesday, hospital representatives in three separate regions reported issues because of the respiratory syncytial virus, the flu and COVID-19.

“We are seeing record high volumes in our emergency rooms, our urgent cares and in our hospitals in general,” said Cincinnati Children’s Hospital’s chief of staff Dr. Patty Manning.

Manning said they haven’t seen the kinds of numbers they’re seeing right now.

“We’ve broken our census records, I’ve lost count of the times we’ve broken them, and for us, that means we have over 600 patients in the hospital, and that’s a lot of patients,” Manning said.

“Our hospitals, especially our pediatric hospitals, right now, are overwhelmed,” said University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children’s of Cleveland Dr. Claudia Hoyen.

In Columbus, there are similar problems.

“We are all experiencing exceptionally high volumes in our emergency departments,” said Nationwide Children’s Hospital’s Dr. Rustin Morse.

Having the three viruses acting together is unusual, but so is the fact that they are hitting earlier in the year than expected.

“What is really unique this year is how much earlier than usual, and the volumes are much higher than usual,” Morse said.

Adding to the concerns is that it all comes as Thanksgiving gatherings are approaching.

Doctors at all three hospitals and with the Ohio Department of Health agreed that getting a flu vaccine and a COVID-19 shot are the best ways to stay healthy.

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